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Welcome! on March 14th, 2009

Welcome to This Old Farm’s Website! Here we strive to bring you the information needed to make local, sustainably grown food products as accessible as possible. This Old Farm was first started in 2000 to bring good, clean food to area families from Erick and Jessica Smith’s 88 acre farm. We continue to do that today. We are small enough to care about each and every family. In an effort to make good food more accessible, we have now expanded to process locally raised meats and to represent 20 different farms through a farm alliance so that we can bring clean, local food to not only our traditional retail families but to commercial markets as well. Through the alliance, we are large enough to supply your commercial, school, or wholesale needs for good, locally raised foods. Buying local is one of the greenest things you can do and we want it to be easy to source product. It’s our passion. While you are here, sign up for our e-newsletter. We will keep you up to date on what’s new in local foods and healthy living.

Many Blessings,
Erick and Jessica Smith

Farm Photos on March 13th, 2009


See more photos of the farm »

Are you Ready for Easter????? on March 27th, 2015

Are you ready for Easter????

Leg of Lamb – 20% off
Easter Hams – 20% off

Go on-line today to place your order www.thisoldfarminc.com

Or give us a call today at 765-324-2161 and place your order!

Has California’s Megadrought Already Begun? What can Indiana do??? on March 25th, 2015

One of the reasons that we need to diversify ag and work to bring produce back to Indiana is that most of our produce growing states are severely water deprived. Indiana has good soils and access to water. We need large wells throughout the state to bring it to the surface but it is there.

HAS CALIFORNIA’S MEGADROUGHT ALREADY BEGUN?

This story was originally published by Slate and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

As California limps through another nearly rain-free rainy season, the state is taking increasingly bold action to save water.

On March 17, the California state government imposed new mandatory restrictions on lawn watering and incentives to limit water use in hotels and restaurants as part of its latest emergency drought regulations. On March 19, California Gov. Jerry Brown announced a $1 billion plan to support water projects statewide and speed aid to hard-hit communities already dealing with shortages. Last month, federal water managers announced a “zero allocation” of agricultural water to a key state canal system for the second year in a row, essentially transforming thousands of acres of California farmland into dust.

The recent moves come after the state has fallen behind targets to increase water efficiency in 2015 amid the state’s worst drought in 1,200 years. Last year, voters passed a $7.5 billion water bond and the legislature approved its first-ever restrictions on groundwater pumping, which won’t go into full effect until 2025. Stricter, more immediate limits on water use are possible as summer approaches.

But it’s not enough. These moves are small potatoes compared to what’s needed to rein in statewide water use, of which agriculture forms the vast majority. Earlier this month, a pair of op-eds, one in the Guardian and the other in the Los Angeles Times, spoke with urgency about the West’s growing water crisis.

“California has no contingency plan for a persistent drought like this one (let alone a 20-plus-year mega-drought), except, apparently, staying in emergency mode and praying for rain,” wrote NASA water scientist and University of California-Irvine professor Jay Famiglietti. A better plan, he said, was for “immediate mandatory water rationing” across the state. Famiglietti’s work has focused on the shocking recent declines in groundwater across the West, where excessive pumping has caused the ground to sink at rates of up to one foot per year and a measurable rise in global sea levels.

Underlying the frantic, short-term search for water is an ominous underlying trend that threatens to fundamentally transform America’s most important agricultural state. Climate change may have already initiated a new megadrought.

But first, a reality check: California’s cities have more than enough water to withstand the current drought and then some. They simply don’t use that much. Not true for agriculture, which uses 80 percent of California’s water — 10 percent of that just on almonds. Though it’s still a national powerhouse, fed increasingly by fast-depleting groundwater supplies, the state’s agriculture industry has likely begun a long-term decline due mostly to simple math. Abnormally dry conditions have dominated in 11 of the last 15 years, and the cuts have to come from somewhere. Agriculture is the elephant in the ever-shrinking room of California water.

California’s record low snowpack threatens the existence of agriculture in the nation’s most productive state.California’s record low snowpack threatens the existence of agriculture in the nation’s most productive state.California Department of Water Resources

Statewide, California’s snowpack is now at a record low — just 12 percent of normal, and less than half of last year’s astonishingly meager total. Normally, California’s snowpack holds the equivalent of about 15 million acre-feet of water around its traditional April 1 peak, about as much as all the state’s reservoirs combined. This year, it’s as if half of the state’s water reserves simply vanished. It’s difficult to imagine the hardship the state will face this summer as the rivers of snowmelt that normally feed the state during the dry season dwindle dangerously. As I wrote last year during my drought-themed reporting trip across the West, California just wasn’t built to handle a world without snow.

But it’s not just California. It’s been freakishly hot out West all winter. Other states are also suffering, with record-low water levels expected this year in the two major reservoirs on the Colorado River: Lake Mead and Lake Powell. The warm winter has helped to dry up the land even more, and preemptively melt what little snow has graciously fallen.

If a megadrought has already begun — and there is increasingly strong evidence to support that it has, or will soon — there will be widespread implications, including a significant re-shifting of California agriculture outside the state. The California of the past is gone, and climate change is bringing a new one faster than it seems we’re ready for.

ft_150320_droughtcharts-crop-promovar-mediumlarge

California’s record low snowpack threatens the existence of agriculture in the nation’s most productive state.California’s record low snowpack threatens the existence of agriculture in the nation’s most productive state.California Department of Water Resources

Farm Bureau Ag Day! on March 25th, 2015

Jessica Farm Bureau

Jessica Smith speaks at the Farm Bureau Ag Day at Neal Farms in Clinton County.

For a link to the article, please click on In the News – Farm Bureau Ag Day!

We Are Hiring!!!! on March 19th, 2015

This Old Farm is looking to fill several different positions now and in the near future.

* Wholesale Account Manager/Sales Manager

* Processing Room Crew – Several positions!

* Charcuterie Chef – Smoked Meat Specialist

* General Food Safety Manager

If you are interested in joining the This Old Farm family, please email your resume to kris@thisoldfarminc.com or come by the facility at 9572 W County Road 650 S, Colfax, IN 46035 to complete an application!

Our mission is to bring healthful, local food to Indiana by sustaining, nurturing, and prospering the family farm through cooperative distribution of local, environmentally conscience foods at a cost that both supports the farmer while representing the true cost and value for the customer.

We have programs supporting Farm to Schools, Local Food Promotion, and Farmer’s Assistance, if you would like to be part of this growing grass-roots company, contact us today!!!!

Ninety-seven percent of US farms are family-owned – from the USDA on March 19th, 2015

Posted on March 17, 2015 by Office of Public Affairs

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reports that family-owned farms remain the backbone of the agriculture industry. The latest data come from the Census of Agriculture farm typology report and help shine light on the question, “What is a family farm?”

“As we wrap up mining the 6 million data points from the latest Census of Agriculture, we used typology to further explore the demographics of who is farming and ranching today,” said NASS Statistics Division Director Hubert Hamer. “What we found is that family-owned businesses, while very diverse, are at the core of the U.S. agriculture industry. In fact, 97 percent of all U.S. farms are family-owned.”

The 2012 Census of Agriculture Farm Typology report is a special data series that primarily focuses on the “family farm.” By definition, a family farm is any farm where the majority of the business is owned by the operator and individuals related to the operator, including through blood, marriage, or adoption. Key highlights from the report include the following five facts about family farms in the United States:

Five Facts to Know about Family Farms

1. Food equals family – 97 percent of the 2.1 million farms in the United States are family-owned operations.

2. Small business matters – 88 percent of all U.S. farms are small family farms.

3. Local connections come in small packages – 58 percent of all direct farm sales to consumers come from small family farms.

4. Big business matters too – 64 percent of all vegetable sales and 66 percent of all dairy sales come from the 3 percent of farms that are large or very large family farms.

5. Farming provides new beginnings – 18 percent of principal operators on family farms in the U.S. started within the last 10 years.

“Whether small or large – on the East Coast, West Coast, or the Midwest – family farms produce food and fiber for people all across the U.S. and the world,” said Hamer. “It’s due in part to information such as this from the Census of Agriculture that we can help show the uniqueness and importance of U.S. agriculture to rural communities, families, and the world.”

The 2012 Census of Agriculture Farm Typology report classifies all farms into unique categories based on three criteria: who owns the operation, whether farming is the principal operator’s primary occupation, and gross cash farm cash income (GCFI). Small family farms have GCFI less than $350,000; midsize family farms have GCFI from $350,000 to $999,999; and large family farms have GCFI of $1 million or more. Small farms are further divided based on whether the principal operator works primarily on or off the farm.

To access all the data products from the Census typology report, including Highlights, infographics and maps, visit www.agcensus.usda.gov.